Vet Services Hawkes Bay Ltd

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Pet InsurancePet Insurance

Kathryn Sigvertsen BSc, BVSc
Veterinarian

Many people know the importance of insuring their items, their house or car, even their own health.  Fortunately we are also able to insure pets, for not only medical and surgical care but in some cases routine visits can be covered (including vaccinations and wellness checks/blood tests).  Like any insurance, the hope is that you won’t need it, but when you do you’ll be glad you had it!  There are several different providers and each has their own policy types, terms and conditions.  Most have a range of covers starting at a basic level of care, covering surgery or accidents only, to a comprehensive plan which covers everything including routine preventative health care.  Premiums vary depending on the plan type and the species or breed of animal being covered, and whether full cover is required or partial payment (for example insurance can cover 80% or 100% of the fee).

Having the back-up of pet insurance allows your vet to fully investigate and/or treat health problems without having to cut corners due to financial constraints.  It can be difficult to not be able to perform some critical tests, or be limited with treatment options when faced with a seriously ill family pet.  Just as with human medicine, there are many advanced options available, including CT and MRI, advanced orthopaedics (such as hip replacements), and new innovative medical treatments.   Although most conditions can be managed within the clinic there are times when referral to another facility or a specialist is required, for intensive testing or treatment which can become very expensive.  If a pet is insured this can reduce the financial burden on the owner so this referral can become a possibility, therefore allowing the beloved furry family member to live a longer life than ever before.

For more information about pet insurance, and for some free puppy or kitten cover, speak to one of the staff at Vet Services.


Fleas

Read more >Friday 28th of September 2018: When a flea bites, its saliva causes the dog to itch. Fleas not only cause skin problems for dogs and us but can also cause other disease such as anaemia, flea allergy dermatitis and tapeworms.


Healthy Teeth

Read more >Friday 28th of September 2018: Dogs, like us, have two sets of teeth during their lives. The deciduous (baby) teeth appear shortly after birth and are replaced by the permanents at around four to six months of age. Deciduous teeth cause few problems except where they are retained beyond about eight months of age. If this occurs, displacement of the erupting permanents may result.


Have you got an itchy dog?

Read more >Friday 28th of September 2018: During the spring and summer months we see high numbers of dogs with itchy skin.In the past, the only way to manage atopy (itchy skin) was through medications such as steroids and antihistamines but Royal Canin nutritionists and veterinarians have developed a new Prescription Diet specially formulated to help manage environmental sensitivities in dogs.


Fleas

Read more >Thursday 30th of August 2018: When a flea bites, its saliva causes the dog to itch. The adult fleas you see on your dog only represent 5% of the whole flea population. Flea problems can appear to come and go. This is because the immature stages of the flea (eggs, pupae) wait in the environment for the right conditions (Warmth, humidity and stimulation) When this happens they tend to hatch all at once onto the unsuspecting animal.


Ticks

Read more >Thursday 30th of August 2018: Ticks live in areas of long grass and dense shrubs. They wait for animals to come along, and then grab onto their fur. Once on the animal, they find areas of thin skin and attach with cement-like saliva to feed on blood.


Toe Nail Injuries

Read more >Thursday 30th of August 2018: A break in the toe nail or dewclaw causes a cracked nail with an exposed nail bed. This can be extremely painful. If left untreated, nail infections can spread up to the joint of the toe and can lead to irreparable damage such that the toe itself has to be amputated.


Constipation Issues

Read more >Thursday 30th of August 2018: Constipation is an obstruction of the colon with difficulty to pass faeces or the inability to defaecate at all. Clinical signs are:

- Straining to defaecate
- Defaecating small amounts of dry hard firm stool
- Straining with small amounts of liquid stool
- Occasional vomiting
- Not wanting to eat
- Depression / Lethargy


Heat Stroke

Read more >Thursday 30th of August 2018: Heat stroke can be an extremely deadly emergency.

We see it mainly in summer but it can occur at any time.

During hot summer days, start work early if you can. Try to avoid the main hottest parts of the day. If you have large work days, alternate your team, so dogs get a good chance to rest.


FOOT BALANCE

Read more >Friday 27th of July 2018:


Equine Annual Warrant of Fitness

Read more >Friday 27th of July 2018: With the equestrian season kicking off in most disciplines, Spring is a good time for your horse to have its annual “warrant of fitness”.


ENDOSCOPY IN EQUINES

Read more >Wednesday 25th of July 2018: We have had a couple of interesting cases over the last few months where our Vets have been able to use the endoscope to help diagnose and address issues.

The endoscope is a flexible camera/video /light source that we can use to help investigate respiratory tract in horses as they allow us to gain access visually to some of the nooks and cranny’s that make up a horses upper and lower respiratory tract.


Arthritis, not just an old dog problem

Read more >Thursday 29th of March 2018: Arthritis will be in almost all our working dogs by the age of 5. The severity depends on breeding and size of the breed, previous injuries, nutrition and how well they have been looked after.


Medical Management of Arthritis

Read more >Thursday 29th of March 2018: To get the most out of your team, ensure you take measures to keep them comfortable.


Rat Bait

Read more >Thursday 29th of March 2018: Rat bait (rodenticide) poisoning is the most common poisoning we see in the clinic. It generally affects dogs as they are more readily ruled by their stomachs! Rat baits work by preventing the production of clotting factors (anticoagulants). This lack of clotting factors causes prolonged and uncontrolled bleeding which is often fatal if untreated.


Feeding Athletes

Read more >Thursday 29th of March 2018:


TRANSPORT OF HORSES TO EVENTS BY ROAD/SEA:

Read more >Thursday 8th of March 2018: The transportation of horse to events in NZ [such as HOY] is commonplace but in saying that it needs to be managed to maximise athletic performance, and minimise the risk of any negative impact on horse health. After all it is a long expensive and disappointing trip to an event to have your horse perform below their best.

Road transport can be detrimental to horse's lungs, muscles, gut function and weight


EQUINE CASE: ACUTE EYE TRAUMA

Read more >Thursday 8th of March 2018: Alfie is a 22 year old Kaimanawa gelding who had the misfortune of getting the wrong end of a stick during a wind-storm.

He presented with acute right eye pain – eyelids tightly closed with profuse tearing.


Attention all rabbit owners – are your rabbits up to date with their vaccination??

Read more >Friday 2nd of March 2018:


The Tetanus Grin

Read more >Friday 22nd of December 2017: Tetanus is a condition that is caused by bacteria called, Clostridium tetani. The bacteria infects wounds where there is little to no oxygen and produces a toxin that affects nerves (neurotoxin) in a way that prevents muscles from relaxing, thus causing stiffness.

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