Vet Services Hawkes Bay Ltd

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Deer Special TopicDeer Special Topic

In what has become a regular feature of our May calendar, we host a group of final year Massey University vet students here who are doing a Special Interest Topic in deer.

While the deer industry has shrunk somewhat after a number of financially tough years, the Bay is still home to a significant part of the NZ deer farming scene. And with a long association with the industry, right back to the pioneering days, Vet Services is still very much involved, both locally and nationally.

We have up to a dozen keen students here for a morning with their lecturer Dr. Peter Wilson, running through practical aspects of deer vet practice. Richard Hilson has amassed a large number of photos of nearly every type of large animal we work with and there are plenty of pictures of clinical cases in deer to discuss with the students. Along with Ian Walker, our Practice Manager, he attempts to provide the students with a reality check about the real deal of veterinary practice with deer– that mostly it is physical routine work but with a fair dose of very interesting animal health cases. And some interesting deer farmers to work with and learn from too!

The afternoon session involves a visit to the deer farm of George Williams at Tikokino. The Williams family have had a long association with the training of young agricultural types, including working with the Smedley Station cadets. George, who is also the President of the CHB Farmers Veterinary Club, runs a breeding herd of about 400 hinds as well as a velveting herd. Stock manager Ken Rowe runs in a group of deer for the students to work with so they can pick up hints on animal handling skills.

A farm tour around the very picturesque deer unit follows, along with some pressure questions for the hosts from some enquiring young minds.

This sort of “job” involves some time and effort but does give our practice good exposure to the right sort of enthusiastic veterinary graduates that may one day want to come and work with us. Like the scores of secondary (and primary) students whom we also host during term time and school holidays, we aim to show them all a “slice of vet life”- not all James Herriot mind you, but plenty of variation and lots of work with man and beast!

If you want to work with animals, it’s probably the best job since Noah parked The Ark.


Tick Control in Deer

Read more >Friday 1st of April 2016: NZ has just one species of tick and luckily it doesn't carry any major diseases. However, we are seeing increasingly more properties with tick problems, especially deer farms.


Pre-Lamb Ewe Parasite Control

Read more >Friday 1st of April 2016: For those of you that subscribe to the AgLetter - I refer you to the excellent article of the 3rd July issue. As usual Chris Garland and his team get the "good noise" on issues and present excellent information to the industry. This article reviewed the practice of using Long Acting (LA) treatments in ewes pre lamb and my comments are as follows (you will need to read the article first).


Lice in Sheep

Read more >Friday 1st of April 2016: Lice infestation in sheep is primarily caused by the biting louse Bovicola Ovis.


Why Use a Teaser Ram? And How?

Read more >Friday 1st of April 2016: Teaser rams are entire rams that have been vasectomised. They have both testes still so they are keen to do the job but the operation has rendered them infertile - permanently. They are used to encourage ewes to begin oestrus activity in autumn and if used correctly the teaser rams can get this oestrus activity very well synchronized. This has some big positives - read on.


Toxoplasma Abortion in Sheep

Read more >Friday 1st of April 2016: The Cause: A protozoal parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, causing 20-30% of ewe abortions in this country.


Camplyobacter Abortions in Sheep

Read more >Friday 1st of April 2016: The Cause: The bacterium, Campylobacter fetus. Formerly known as "vibrio".


Refugia

Read more >Friday 1st of April 2016: One of the tools in the parasite battle toolbox is the concept of "refugia". It goes against a farmer's natural instinct to kill every parasite because it means deliberately leaving 5-10% of each mob undrenched. This is done to maintain parasites susceptible to drenches because they've never been exposed.


Reproduction Cycle

Read more >Friday 1st of April 2016: Dogs have an interesting reproductive cycle, rather different to most domestic animals that cycle either seasonally or throughout the year. In the domestic canine, females cycle more or less every six months, with larger breeds tending to cycle less frequently - sometimes only once a year.


Feeding Working Dogs

Read more >Friday 1st of April 2016: Eukanuba Adult Large Breed Premium Performance Formula. Recommended for large and giant breed adult dogs weighing 25kg or more.


Equine Dentistry

Read more >Friday 1st of April 2016: With the current surge in interest in equine dentistry, more than a few myths have crept into popular belief. Find out more.


Laminitis

Read more >Friday 1st of April 2016: Spring and early summer are the high risk periods for pasture - induced laminitis, so this is a timely reminder of what this disease is and how you can avoid it.


Vaccination

Read more >Friday 1st of April 2016: There have been some statements regarding vaccination in dogs (and Dobermans in particular) floating around the internet for some time now which in my opinion are a cause for concern. Vaccination of dogs is done for one reason only - to protect the health of the animal by providing it with immunity against certain very serious diseases.


Sheep Measles

Read more >Friday 1st of April 2016: Sheep measles (Taenia Ovis) unlike true hydatids (Echinococcus granulosus) has no human health risks, but its importance lies in the fact that it leads to cysts through the carcass of the animal which are unsightly and lets face it, who wants to eat meat with visible oozing cysts.


Poisons in Dogs

Read more >Friday 1st of April 2016: Dogs and cats can be poisoned by products that are readily available around the house as well as those that are being used to reduce the possum, rat/mice and slug population. Remember dogs are natural scavengers and even during a hard days work can usually find time to snack on a tasty morsel that they come across.


Gastric Torsion in Dogs

Read more >Friday 1st of April 2016: We have in the past few weeks seen a number of dogs suffering from acute bloat caused by torsion (twisting) of the stomach. This is one condition which constitutes a true emergency as these animals need surgery very early in the course of the bloat if they are to be saved.


Death by Chocolate: When to call the vet

Read more >Friday 1st of April 2016: As we enter the time of year where a lot of chocolate is about, we often get phone calls from owners wondering what to do after their pet has possibly or almost certainly eaten some chocolate, or cocoa containing cakes and biscuits.


Treating the Itch

Read more >Friday 1st of April 2016:


Prescription Diets for Skin Disease

Read more >Friday 1st of April 2016: There are many skin conditions that we see on a regular basis, one of the most common being Canine Atopy which is essentially itchy skin caused by allergies. The severity of the disease is variable and can range from mild itching and redness to more severe skin and ear infections.


Case Study - The Bionic Dog and Cutting Edge Technology

Read more >Friday 1st of April 2016: Zac presented to the clinic with left hind-limb lameness of a short duration. We took x-rays of his hock region (ankle), as a swelling was found in this area. This showed an osteosarcoma or bone tumour, these tumors generally hold a very poor prognosis and we often have to amputate the leg (non curative but can extend life expectancy).

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